Menu

Blog.

Mick’s Beginners Guide To EDM

EDM crowd




Since Mick discovered EDM a decade ago, he hasn’t looked back. EDM has the power to make converts and change lives. But while EDM has had a shorter lifespan compared to some musical genres, right now it’s massive. But with so much awesome stuff to wade through, how do you make sense of it all? Here is Mick’s beginners guide to EDM.

EDM covers all electronic dance music. As time goes on and technology improves, the music just gets deeper and more mainstream.

1. House
This is best place to start. Mick mostly spins House because he knows it’ll jam the dance floor. Evolving from disco, House is the biggest, the most important, and the earliest genre of EDM. It has spawned tons of sub-genres like progresssive house and electro house with the same simple goal: make it a party.

Check out: deadmau5, Steve Aoki

beginners-guide-to-edm-steve-aoki

2. Techno
If House is Coca-Cola, Techno is Pepsi. Techno started in Detroit in the ’80s and then went global to become one of the biggest genres in EDM. Techno is more repetitive than House, but blends in all kinds of different styles from funk to jazz to Afrobeat. DJs usually use retro equipment like old school drum machines and early synths. Mick spins Techno when House just isn’t enough.

Check out: Greg Notill, Umek

beginners-guide-to-edm-umek

3. Trance
Trance is what you can expect to hear if you go to a rave. There is a formula to Trance that’s designed to get your heart pumping and keep you in the zone. There’s a bit of House and a bit of Techno in Trance, but the key goal is to keep you blissed out for as long as possible.

Check out: Tiesto, Armin van Buuren

beginners-guide-to-edm-tiesto

4. Dubstep
Mick hates Dubstep, but you can’t deny that this newcomer is making waves — sound waves. You can’t watch a trailer for an action film without hearing Dubstep now. It’s like House music getting electrocuted. As a result, it’s excellent for the car but not the greatest in a club environment.

Check out: Skream & Benga, Skrillex

beginners-guide-to-edm-skrillex

5. Drum and Bass
Drum and bass is known for being stripped down and seriously fast, usually tipping the scale at 190 bpm’s. This one is better left to the kids.

Check out: Goldie, Bad Company

beginners-guide-to-edm-goldie

While this guide only scratches the surface of EDM, there more to explore: UK Garage, Hardstyle, Grime, Hardcore, Jungle, Breakbeat and IDM.

If you want to learn more about EDM or just get to hear what’s new and awesome, tune into bpm:tv

Share Your Thoughts!